Day trip to Berghaus…

Product Design students visited the Berghaus Design Centre to present their interim concepts for trail running, walking shoes.   After a tour of the facility, the students presented their work to apparel designer, Margot Gandelin and Footwear designer, Joe O’connell (pictured right)   The tour gave students a fantastic insight into Berghaus trend forecasting, design process and garment testing procedures.   We look forward to presenting the final designs to the company in early May.

 

‘Design Plumbing’: an insight into the life of Product Design alumni Matt Hulbert

Matt Hulbert; BA Hons (First Class), MSc

Having graduated from Teesside University’s prestigious Product Design course in 2010, I found myself working within the exciting world of commercial design just three months after graduation. I joined a team of like minded designers at E3Design in Newcastle, where we worked on many household products that millions of people still use daily. At E3 we considered ourselves to be ‘Design Plumbers’ – called in at any point within the design cycle to assist in which ever way we were required to do so. Every day we were met with new challenges, whether it was to re-engineer a specific type of valve for costing down purposes or the conceptualisation and production of specialist laboratory equipment, no task was too big or too small. I am a big believer that Product Design is a creative extension of problem solving, and to be successful within the industry it’s more important that you develop a plethora of skills. My time at Teesside helped me to do just that, we were encouraged not only to develop our drawing, CAD and model making skills but importantly to ask questions and constantly address problems and apply creative thinking to overcome them.

It’s this core skill set that helped me to find my place in the industry and then go on to successfully design and launch my own invention, a digital golf training aid called TALON.  In 2014 I left E3 (whom I continue to work closely with) and started Ojee Golf Ltd with my father, Paul. The last three years I’ve been fortunate enough to embark on an incredible journey, we successfully crowdfunded the TALON on Indiegogo selling 178 TALON units to 20 different countries. We’ve raised more than £150K in funding and were invited to Orlando and Shanghai to help promote UK business.

One of my greatest achievements to date has been realigning with Teesside University on the very course that I graduated from just seven short years ago, only this time as a part-time lecturer. I owe a great deal of gratitude to the University, the course and the lecturers so it feels good to play a part in the future of the course. If I can help to instil the same design values in today’s students that I learnt during my years on the course than it will give them everything they need to help pave their way into a successful design career.

All aboard at Cannes

Product Design graduate Mārtiņš Ēlerts, who now works for Dixon Yacht Design in Southampton, has just got back from the Cannes Yachting Festival where the new Sealine C430 motor boat was unveiled.

“This is not the first boat that I have worked on to hit the water, but it is the first project where I had the privilege to see the entire development process. From the beginning, the very first sketch, initial CAD model, all the way to a finished boat moored up at the Cannes Yachting Festival. My main role in this project was to build the exterior CAD model, which was then further developed by our team of engineers and naval architects.”

 

It’s a fairly rapid design process, as most of the fine design features are created on the go. Some quick dirty 20 second sketch might happen every now and then, but usually all the different ideas are quickly modelled in 3D and agreed on, or dismissed, without ever touching a piece of paper or pencil. The main advantage is the ability to see and evaluate every idea from all angles in the correct proportions in the actual environment. Might not sound like the traditional design process, but it’s the reality of working in a small team, with short deadlines.”

 

“Now just have to wait for the chance to go on sea trials with the team.”

And here is a video of it on water
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1usynPl_zc

 

 

Tees Made in London 2017

Last week, during probably the hottest week of the year, Graduates of Product Design exhibited their work at the New Designers Exhibition.

New Designers, hailed as the most important design event in the UK, ensures the life cycle of the design industry continues and thrives. It provokes fresh thinking and kick-starts careers, providing a pipeline of young talent into one of the UK’s leading sectors.

Each year brings 3,000 graduate talents from the UK’s leading design courses to exhibit and showcase their work with the aim of networking and getting themselves noticed.

This year was arguably our most successful to date with plenty of interest for all the students and potential employment opportunities. One student, Ben Ryder, was selected as one of the top 20 show highlights from all those exhibiting by Innovate UK, the Knowledge Transfer Network.

Our students, through organised events and ‘live’ projects, and through sponsorship, raised funding for the exhibition.

Tees Made in London 2016

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Last July, in the sweltering heat of London, students from product design exhibited their final project work at the New Designers Exhibition in Islington.

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New Designers allows students to showcase their work alongside fellow graduates from across the UK with the aim of getting themselves noticed and that first foot on the ladder, which will help shape their future.

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New Designers takes place every year at the Business Design Centre which was once the Royal Horticultural Hall. Over 3.500 graduates exhibited from institutes all across the UK.

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Funding for the exhibition was raised by the students, through organized events and ‘live’ projects, and through sponsorship.

Well done Jess

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2nd year Product Design student Jess Chambers’ Safe Sanitation project was selected to be showcased at the Design Museum’s Design Factory Symposium.

The museum, which is devoted to contemporary design, annually sets a challenge to degree design students to help promote the museum as an essential resource for research and practice.

Jess’ idea and design for the Prive Cube, a toilet for use in Third World Countries, was among entries selected to take part in the symposium at the London museum, chosen by design industry experts. Her design was inspired by a past trip to Gambia with the Affecting Real Change charity.

Jess said: ‘I am interested in designs which can help to make lives easier for people, after being inspired by a company’s designs to take tablet computers into African schools to help children learn. This inspired me to design something which would help to make life at school easier for children living in Africa.

‘My initial research revealed that sanitation was one of the main issues why children in the Gambia missed school. I also discovered that one in three people in Africa are unable to use a public toilet safely as they are at risk either from sexual assault or attacks by an animal, due to the design of some toilets with many not having a lock. It is a shocking statistic.

‘Toilets in use are often nothing more than a metal hut, which is not very secure. There is also additional issue that there is not often a lock, or the lock is often the outside.’

As part of her research, Jess spoke to the Affecting Real Change charity, which is involved in projects in Africa and India with schools and communities to help improve everyday life. This led Jess to focus on security as a key issue, along with ensuring the toilets would be suitable for use by both genders.

Jess said: ‘The main issues I found with the current toilet design were sanitation and security, which I used as the basis of my design and to provide users with safe sanitation.’

She received a certificate in recognition of her design idea.

16 Degrees

Last week saw the opening of the Product Design Degree show which is part of 16 Degrees, a celebration of the hard work, dedication and creativity of students from our School of Arts & Media. It was a busy night with friends, family and colleagues from Industry all celebrating the hard work that went into the projects on display.

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