FAT MAKES YOU FAT?

Consuming fat turns you a fluffy, fatty person? That has been a question for decades. Does obesity really has anything to do with eating fats? Let us get a in-depth look at the fat, in addition to the proven research and the myths about the fat and what is the real culprit that really makes people fat.

What is Fat?

According to researcher fat is one among the three essential micronutrients (carbohydrate and protein) of human body. While, there is a misconception that fat intake makes people fatty and fluffy.

It’s time to end the low-fat myth. That’s because the percentage of calories from fat that you eat, whether high or low, isn’t really linked with disease. What really matters is the type of fat you eat.

Choose foods with healthy fats, limit foods high in saturated fat, and avoid foods with trans fat.

“Good” fats—monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats—lower disease risk. Foods high in good fats include vegetable oils (such as olive, canola, sunflower, soy, and corn), nuts, seeds, and fish.

“Bad” fats—saturated and, especially, trans fats—increase disease risk. Foods high in bad fats include red meat, butter, cheese, and ice cream, as well as processed foods made with trans fat from partially hydrogenated oil.

The key to a healthy diet is to choose foods that have more good fats than bad fats—vegetable oils instead of butter, salmon instead of steak—and that don’t contain any trans fat.

The low-down on low-fat

“Low-fat,” “reduced fat,” or “fat-free” processed foods are not necessarily healthy. One problem with a generic lower-fat diet is that it prompts most people to stop eating fats that are good for the heart along with those that are bad for it. And low-fat diets are often higher in refined carbohydrates and starches from foods like white rice, white bread, potatoes, and sugary drinks.

When food manufacturers take out fat, they often replace it with carbohydrates from sugar, refined grains, or starch. Our bodies digest these refined carbohydrates and starches very quickly, causing blood sugar and insulin levels to spike and then dip, which in turn leads to hunger, overeating, and weight gain.

Over time, eating lots of “fast carbs” can raise the risk of heart disease and diabetes as much as—or more than—eating too much saturated fat.

So when you cut back on foods like red meat and butter, replace them with fish, beans, nuts, and healthy oils—not with refined carbohydrates.

Cholesterol

Although it is still important to limit the amount of cholesterol you eat, especially if you have diabetes, for most people dietary cholesterol isn’t nearly the villain it’s been portrayed to be. Cholesterol in the bloodstream, specifically the bad LDL cholesterol, is what’s most important. And the biggest influence on blood cholesterol level is the mix of fats and carbohydrates in your diet—not the amount of cholesterol you eat from food.

Why does most of the Diet fails!

Author: Kumar, Vasanth (Sports Scientist – Performance Coach)

            Have you ever wondered why “dieting” Fails? If you have this question here is the answer that you have searched for all years long.

“Scientists say that human body were genetically designed to accumulate fat based on the days when we had to forage for food in the wild.  Ignoring that fact becomes hazardous to both our health and our waistlines. We have very few genes to protect us from overeating while with starvation protection, we have many and that is one of the causes for the fail.”

The reason diets backfire almost all the time is that people restrict too much. The number of calories consumed daily drops below the resting metabolic rate (RMR) while this basic amount of energy or calories is needed to run your metabolism per day. For an average person it is about 10 times your body weight in pounds (international standard). Remember Resting metabolic Rate is nothing but your daily basic need for your body to simply be alive (Just stay in bed without any energy expenditure).

If you eat lesser than the RMR (which the most diets mandate), your body will instantly perceive danger and alarms the systems that protects and defends your from starvation which furthers slows the metabolism. Therefore, your body goes for starvation mode and signals to eat. You start eating more than much-needed and you stop the diet that is a classic rebounding weight gain scenario. Just think of what happens when you skip breakfast, work through lunch, and finally return home in the evening: you eat everything in sight. Then you feel stuffed, sick, and guilty.

Strategies to Stop Overeating

Cut out the processed stuff and eat real, whole foods.

The single most important thing to lose weight and avoid overeating is to include as many real, whole, unprocessed foods in your diet as possible. Starting now, make the switch to these foods to lose weight: vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds, olive oil, organic, range, or grass-fed animal products (poultry, lamb, beef, pork, eggs), and wild, smaller fish such as salmon.

Eat breakfast.

Skipping breakfast means you’re eventually starving, and throughout the day you eat much more food than needed to feel full.

Eat Peacefully.

We need to be in a relaxed state for the nervous system of our gut or digestive system to work properly. Eating while we are stressed out makes us fat, both because we don’t digest our food properly and because stress hormones slow metabolism and promote fat storage, especially of belly fat. We also tend to overeat when we eat quickly, because it takes the stomach 20 minutes to signal the brain that we are full.

Moderate or cut alcohol.

Besides getting rid of extra sugar calories, will help you tune in to your true appetite and prevent you from overeating.

Beware of trigger foods.

For some of us, that one little soda can set us on a downward spiral to overeating and all the negative health consequences that come with it. It isn’t just the processed, sugary foods and drinks that become triggers. But even healthy foods, if you have a tendency to binge on them, can quickly become unhealthy. A handful of almonds are perfectly healthy, but if you eat half the jar, they quickly become unhealthy.

Get enough sleep.

Get eight hours of quality, uninterrupted sleep every night. You’ll find that you’re less prone to cravings and you will normalize fat-regulating hormones. One study found even a partial night’s sleep deprivation contributes to insulin resistance, paving the way for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Control stress levels.

Most of us fail to notice the effects of the chronic stresses we live with every day: demanding jobs, marital tension, lack of sleep, too much to do and too little time to do it. I am sure the list goes on for many. Chronic stress makes us overeat, not to mention overeating the wrong kinds of food, which ultimately leads to weight gain. Remember “Stressed” spelled in reverse is “Desserts”

Exercise the right way.

You can’t over-exercise your way out of a bad diet, but the right exercise can help you lose weight, maintain weight loss, and control your appetite so you don’t overeat. Ideally you should do a minimum of 30 minutes of cardio at least 3 days a week. More vigorous and sustained exercise is often needed to reverse severe obesity and diabesity. Run, bike, dance, play games, jump on a trampoline, or do whatever is fun for you.

Supplement if needed.

Obesity and diabetes are often paradoxically states of malnutrition. It has been said that diabetes is starvation in the midst of plenty. The sugar cannot get into the cells. Your metabolism is sluggish, and the cells do not communicate as a finely tuned team. Nutrients are an essential part of getting back in balance and correcting the core problem— insulin resistance.

External Links

Click here for BMR Calculator