Why does most of the Diet fails!

Author: Kumar, Vasanth (Sports Scientist – Performance Coach)

            Have you ever wondered why “dieting” Fails? If you have this question here is the answer that you have searched for all years long.

“Scientists say that human body were genetically designed to accumulate fat based on the days when we had to forage for food in the wild.  Ignoring that fact becomes hazardous to both our health and our waistlines. We have very few genes to protect us from overeating while with starvation protection, we have many and that is one of the causes for the fail.”

The reason diets backfire almost all the time is that people restrict too much. The number of calories consumed daily drops below the resting metabolic rate (RMR) while this basic amount of energy or calories is needed to run your metabolism per day. For an average person it is about 10 times your body weight in pounds (international standard). Remember Resting metabolic Rate is nothing but your daily basic need for your body to simply be alive (Just stay in bed without any energy expenditure).

If you eat lesser than the RMR (which the most diets mandate), your body will instantly perceive danger and alarms the systems that protects and defends your from starvation which furthers slows the metabolism. Therefore, your body goes for starvation mode and signals to eat. You start eating more than much-needed and you stop the diet that is a classic rebounding weight gain scenario. Just think of what happens when you skip breakfast, work through lunch, and finally return home in the evening: you eat everything in sight. Then you feel stuffed, sick, and guilty.

Strategies to Stop Overeating

Cut out the processed stuff and eat real, whole foods.

The single most important thing to lose weight and avoid overeating is to include as many real, whole, unprocessed foods in your diet as possible. Starting now, make the switch to these foods to lose weight: vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds, olive oil, organic, range, or grass-fed animal products (poultry, lamb, beef, pork, eggs), and wild, smaller fish such as salmon.

Eat breakfast.

Skipping breakfast means you’re eventually starving, and throughout the day you eat much more food than needed to feel full.

Eat Peacefully.

We need to be in a relaxed state for the nervous system of our gut or digestive system to work properly. Eating while we are stressed out makes us fat, both because we don’t digest our food properly and because stress hormones slow metabolism and promote fat storage, especially of belly fat. We also tend to overeat when we eat quickly, because it takes the stomach 20 minutes to signal the brain that we are full.

Moderate or cut alcohol.

Besides getting rid of extra sugar calories, will help you tune in to your true appetite and prevent you from overeating.

Beware of trigger foods.

For some of us, that one little soda can set us on a downward spiral to overeating and all the negative health consequences that come with it. It isn’t just the processed, sugary foods and drinks that become triggers. But even healthy foods, if you have a tendency to binge on them, can quickly become unhealthy. A handful of almonds are perfectly healthy, but if you eat half the jar, they quickly become unhealthy.

Get enough sleep.

Get eight hours of quality, uninterrupted sleep every night. You’ll find that you’re less prone to cravings and you will normalize fat-regulating hormones. One study found even a partial night’s sleep deprivation contributes to insulin resistance, paving the way for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Control stress levels.

Most of us fail to notice the effects of the chronic stresses we live with every day: demanding jobs, marital tension, lack of sleep, too much to do and too little time to do it. I am sure the list goes on for many. Chronic stress makes us overeat, not to mention overeating the wrong kinds of food, which ultimately leads to weight gain. Remember “Stressed” spelled in reverse is “Desserts”

Exercise the right way.

You can’t over-exercise your way out of a bad diet, but the right exercise can help you lose weight, maintain weight loss, and control your appetite so you don’t overeat. Ideally you should do a minimum of 30 minutes of cardio at least 3 days a week. More vigorous and sustained exercise is often needed to reverse severe obesity and diabesity. Run, bike, dance, play games, jump on a trampoline, or do whatever is fun for you.

Supplement if needed.

Obesity and diabetes are often paradoxically states of malnutrition. It has been said that diabetes is starvation in the midst of plenty. The sugar cannot get into the cells. Your metabolism is sluggish, and the cells do not communicate as a finely tuned team. Nutrients are an essential part of getting back in balance and correcting the core problem— insulin resistance.

External Links

Click here for BMR Calculator

Footwear with heels and their biomechanical impact on heel pain

Author: Kumar, Vasanth (Sports Scientist – Performance Coach)

Introduction

Women loves high heels, but if they continue wearing them all time chances of significant foot pain and associated problems either can occur directly or exacerbated by wearing heels. (Morin, n.d.).

Any time person wears footwear that disturbs or realigns the natural counter of the foot they are bound to cause foot pain the experts says. While, if you add a bit of inches (high heels) in to this calculations then the pain can soon escalate to damage says Stuart Mogul expert in podiatry. Due to this, there exists the change in the body segmental alignment. For instance wearing high heels will restrict the natural movement of the foot and in addition to the restriction there is increased loading of weight on that area hence the person is not just crushing the toes, but adding exaggerated body weight on them says the Sports Scientist (Biomechanics) Vasanth Kumar from Chennai who is also a performance coach.

Consequences of wearing footwear with heel

                Researchers have found that people wearing high heels (2 Inches or more) have tighter calves. About 13% short on the calf muscle fibres on an average was found in the calf muscle scans among the people with frequent heel wearers in comparison with the people who avoided wearing heels. A study by Journal of Experimental Biology found that high heels led to stiffer calf (Achilles) tendons.

                A study by Professor Marco Narici, (Manchester Metropolitan University) that involved 11 volunteers from 80 group of women who wore 5cms (2 Inches) of heel for over a period of two years had issues and struggled while walking on flat foot (Bare Foot). An MRI Scan of these volunteers showed no significant difference in length of the calf muscles in comparison with the group of women who wore flat shoes. While, an Ultra Sound scan showed shorter calf among the women who wore heels. In addition, the women who wore heels were asked to lie on their front on the couch and the researchers noticed the angle of the heel were greater due to the shortened calf. Above all these, the tendons were much thicker and stiffer among the women wearing heels than those who wore flat footwear that causes discomfort while walking on flat feet since the tendon cannot stretch sufficiently.

Prevention

                Sammy Margo, chartered physiotherapist from London says not to wear heels or flat shoes all the time but to wear variety of heel heights that can keep the muscle in right length (Anon., 2010). Secondly, the researchers and scientists have found out that performing some regular stretching activities can minimise the issue of calf muscle tightening.

Stretching Exercises

  1. Stand on tiptoes on a step, and using a handrail for balance to lower their heels as far as they can and hold the position for 10 – 15 seconds.
  2. Strengthening the Tibialis anterior (Shin Muscle) muscle can be of a help (Toe Raise) for a count of 8 – 10 Repetitions 2 -3 sets a day says the Sports Scientist.

Calf Stretch  Toe Raise (Strengthening)

                          Calf Stretch                                                Toe Raise Strengthening.

Tips

Select footwear with low heels – an inch and a half or lesser while a wider heel base can be of more help; a slightly thicker heel will spread the load more evenly. Narrow, stiletto-type heels provide little support and three inch or higher heels may shorten (Tighten) the Achilles tendon.

Softer insoles can reduce the impact on the knees.

Selecting right size footwear is more essential. Wearing shoes that allow your body to move naturally during walking will allow your feet, legs, hips and back to stretch.

Stretch your muscles as many times as possible during the day and while during rest.

Difference in Radiographs between High Heels and Normal Footwear

Conclusion

       Do not let your sense of style cripple your ability to stand or step pain-free. “Your feet are, quite literally, your base of support. If your feet aren’t happy, nothing above them will be,” says Dr. Nevins. “Take a closer look at your shoe selection and take small steps now to prevent big foot problems later.” (Nevins, 2015). In addition to all these the above exercises as a regular routine will keep the muscles in the right length and can be used as the preventive factor.

References

Anon., 2010. BBC News. [Online] Available at: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-10651020
[Accessed 23 June 2015].

Morin, M., n.d. Director of podiatric medicine, Hackensack University Medical Center: s.n.

Nevins, D., 2015. American Osteopathic Association. [Online] Available at: http://www.osteopathic.org/osteopathic-health/about-your-health/health-conditions-library/womens-health/Pages/high-heels.aspx
[Accessed 23 June 2015].

2015-06-23