3rd HEA Arts and Humanities Annual Learning & Teaching Conference: Post from Perform@tees

The Lowry Theatre in Salford was well represented by the Teesside University staff and students at the 3rd HEA Arts and Humanities annual learning and teaching conference, this year titled ‘Heroes and monsters: extra-ordinary tales of learning and teaching in the arts and humanities’

The first presentation was by Senior Lecturer Heike Salzer who spoke aboutpedagogical research project undertaken with her BA Dance students in spring 2014. She considered the emotional culture that students operate in and if the values and norms develop and change during the course of their degree.

This was followed by Teaching Fellow Richard Sober and two interior students, first year Emily Hogg and second year Rebecca Hayman.  They presented a paper discussing student perceptions of current Higher education debates including value for money, independent learning and developing a readiness for employment.  The session was chaired by Carolyn Bew the National Lead for Art & Design and she invited them to reprise the paper at the HEA Teaching in Practice conference later this month in London

The SAM presenters with HEA Lead Carolyn Bew

HEA

from perform@tees

BA Dance student organises first ever Tees Dance Film Fest: Post from Perform@tees

For my Final Year Creative Project I decided I wanted to do something which was a little bit different; which is why I chose to organise a dance film festival.

During second year I completed a dance for the camera module which was something extremely new and fascinating to me as I had never seen any screen dance films before. For that reason I thought it would be a great idea to give film makers a platform to screen their work to a public audience and also give the audience the chance to explore a different route into Dance.

During the process I collaborated with fellow dance students, Teesside University graphic design student Victor Dina and also Middlesbrough Council, it was a great experience for me to work with so many different people – I also managed to receive support from Tees Valley Dance for my event.

It was the first ever dance film event to be screened in Middlesbrough Centre Square and screened films by both amateur and professional filmmakers from all over the world including John T. Williams who’s films have been presented in over 50 film festivals throughout South America, Europe, Asia and the United States, Oliver Murray and Georgia Parris. The event which took place on Thursday 22nd May also featured a live solo performance by third year Teesside dance student Huey Teng.

With support from Middlesbrough Council the event was able to take place on The Big Screen in Middlesbrough Centre Square, this was a great space to host the event and I was happy that I was able to bring a bit of culture to the town that evening.

I think Tees Dance Film Fest has the ability to become an annual event as it was a great success and I thoroughly enjoyed organising it!

Many thanks to Middlesbrough Council, Tees Valley Dance, Writers Block Big Screen, Victor Dina, Samantha Dixon, Jessica Smith and Phillip Brown for their support on this project.

Holly Bellamy

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Celebrations at the opening of our Degree Show: Post from Tees inside

Many congratulations to all of our graduating students, but a special mention should go to our international students. They have spent only 29 weeks studying in Teesside and have achieved so much!

Teaching Fellow Richard Sober with Kyvie Salvatrice, Ploy Phonrod (studies with us for 3 years), Vanice Ckw, Siew Lin and Evonne Chua.

Teaching Fellow Richard Sober with Kyvie Salvatrice, Ploy Phonrod (studied with us for 3 years), Vanice Ckw, Siew Lin and Evonne Chua.

from Tees inSide

PLRM student bags student-as-researcher summer position: Post from Perform@tees

Following a successful panel interview Oliver Clarke (BA PLRM) was offered the summer post of student-as-researcher (June-Sept). Oliver is to work on a performance based project with staff at the University; the outcome of which is to be presented in September 2014.

 

Oliver will assist Dr Sarah O’Brien on one of her current PaR projects. This may include co-writing, creative design, performing (acting, music, movement) or video editing. The project may also include an opportunity for the student to work alongside other academics and artists in the school.

 

We look forward to seeing the output of the project this September – well done and good luck Ollie!

 

from perform@tees

Interiors at the Lowry…: Post from Tees inside

The Lowry Theatre in Salford was well represented by the Teesside University staff and students at the 3rd HEA Arts and Humanities annual learning and teaching conference, this year titled ‘Heroes and monsters: extra-ordinary tales of learning and teaching in the arts and humanities’

The first presentation was by Senior Lecturer Heike Salzer who spoke aboutpedagogical research project undertaken with her BA Dance students in spring 2014. She considered the emotional culture that students operate in and if the values and norms develop and change during the course of their degree.

This was followed by Teaching Fellow Richard Sober and two interior students, first year Emily Hogg and second year Rebecca Hayman. They presented a paper discussing student perceptions of current Higher education debates including value for money, independent learning and developing a readiness for employment. The session was chaired by Carolyn Bew the National Lead for Art & Design and she invited them to reprise the paper at the HEA Teaching in Practice conference later this month in London

The SAM presenters with HEA Lead Carolyn Bew

conference

from Tees inSide

3rd HEA Arts and Humanities Annual Learning and Teaching Conference

The Lowry Theatre in Salford was well represented by the Teesside University staff and students at the 3rd HEA Arts and Humanities annual learning and teaching conference, this year titled ‘Heroes and monsters: extra-ordinary tales of learning and teaching in the arts and humanities’

The first presentation was by Senior Lecturer Heike Salzer who spoke aboutapedagogical research project undertaken with her BA Dance students in spring 2014 where she considered the emotional culture that students operate in and if the values and norms develop and change during the course of their degree.

This was followed by Teaching Fellow Richard Sober and two interior students, first year Emily Hogg and second year student Rebecca Hayman.  They presented a paper discussing student perceptions of current Higher education debates including value for money, independent learning and developing a readiness for employment.  The session was chaired by Carolyn Bew the National Lead for Art & Design and she invited them to reprise the paper at the HEA Teaching in Practice conference later this month in London

The SAM presenters with HEA National Art & Design Lead Carolyn Bew
The SAM presenters with HEA National Art & Design Lead Carolyn Bew

Choreographer James Wilton as visiting artist working with BA dance students: Post from Perform@tees

James WiltonJames Wilton has worked for two days with the BA Dance students developing exciting new work for the end of year performance. The workshops were energetic days full of new movement and inspiration.

James began his choreographic career whilst a student at London Contemporary Dance School where his works Drift and Threads were toured nationally and internationally with LC3. 

After graduating from LCDS James was commissioned to re-work Drift for Scottish Dance Theatre for touring throughout 2010-2014. In 2013 the work was also staged on Ballet Hagen for performance.

In the past 12 months James has created works for London Contemporary Dance School, Northern School of Contemporary Dance, Brighton University, Roehampton University, Yorkshire Youth Dance, Brighton and Hove Youth Dance, Shoreditch Youth Dance, CAT Laban, CAT Swindon and Junior Dance Company at The Place.

James has also done large amount of education work for many well established dance education organisations, including Youth Dance England, London youth Dance, Connect Sadlers Wells, The Place learning and access, MovingEast and East London Dance.

 

from perform@tees

Durham Cathedral’s Hidden Treasures Revealed

DURHAM Cathedral’s hidden treasures are to go on display thanks to a £4m funding boost.

The Heritage Lottery Fund is funding a grant towards Durham Cathedral’s £10m Open Treasure project, which will see the creation of new exhibition spaces in buildings around the Cathedral’s medieval cloister.

ICONIC: Durham Cathedral set for new exhibition

ICONIC: Durham Cathedral set for new exhibition

Prized asset’s from the archives are to see the light of day for a rare public outing – including an original issue of the Magna Carta.

The Very Reverend Michael Sadgrove, Dean of Durham, said the Open Treasure project has been waiting to go for the past five years.

“It’s vitally important that we reveal these treasures and display them to the public, we have the most complete surviving monastic library anywhere in England.”

Durham Cathedral is one of the country’s best loved buildings and welcomes more then 600,000 people each year.

Several other grants have also been issued and these figures include £500,000 from the Garfield Weston Foundation, £300,000 from the Friends of Durham Cathedral and a final £130,000 from the Monument Trust. 

The exhibition will fully open next year.

Dr Stephen Cherry, a Canon of Durham Cathedral, said: ”Open Treasure is such a wonderful thing for our Cathedral, and it is sure to bring more visitors to our precious site.

“It is unacceptable to have some remarkable artefacts such as the Magna Carta hidden away in the archives, they simply must be put on display and open treasure is going a long way to ensure this.”

As well as displaying its own collections, the Cathedral will focus on a rolling programme of exhibitions that have been loaned from other museums and art galleries.

photo

HEAD of Marketing and Events at Durham Cathedral, Ruth Robson promoting ‘Open Treasure’

The project is to provide Durham Cathedral with an experience to match its international, cultural and historic value, it will open up both buildings and collections so that they can be discovered and enjoyed by people of all ages.

Because of this development the Cathedral is hoping that visitor numbers will increase, generating additional revenue through ancillary spending and donations. This will go towards the on-going conservation of the architecture and collections, however entry to the building will still remain free.

With Open Treasure, the visitors will be taken on an adventure through a sequence of spaces that tell the story of the Cathedral and its rich and full Christian heritage.

Some of the treasures that will be on display to the public will include an original 1216 issue of the Magna Carta and some of the finest religious stonework created in the 1,000 years after Christ.

Open Treasure is going to transform the way visitors can enjoy the Cathedral and hopefully make them gain inspiration from it.

Durham Cathedral said in a statement:

“We are hugely grateful for everything our donors have contributed to this project.

“Thanks to public bodies, charitable trusts as well as other companies and donors we will raise the £10m needed to complete Open Treasure.

“Open Treasure is more then a capital development project, it is essential to the mission of the Cathedral and its future and we are delighted with the changes that are being made.”

The work on the new exhibition started in 2012 and will be accessible and fully open to the public in 2015.

The Dean of Durham added: ”We have priceless Saxon books and manuscripts, which need to be on display because they tell us so much about early Christianity in the North East.

The Lindisfarne Gospels taught us that there is a real appetite to know more about the great heritage of this religion, we’re trying to go beyond that and create something greater.

“Open Treasure will totally transform how we welcome and offer our visitors hospitality to the Cathedral as well as contribute to the visitors economy of Durham and the wider region.”

Tourists from across the globe have named Durham Cathedral as the UK’s number one landmark.

 

Niall Hammond from the Heritage Lottery Fund said:

‘There is some amazing pieces including a few amazing bibles that have been hidden away for hundreds of years.

“Before the Cathedral was actually built, there was an Anglo Saxon church on site which contained a lot of beautiful carved stonework.

County Durham is rich in this sense as we have a lot of amazing stonework and we have pieces that date back for thousands of years.

“The new exhibition spaces will allow the Cathedral to display more of its internationally important collection, whereas at  the moment Durham Cathedral lacks both the space and the specialist facilities to do so.”

from Tside