Wellbeing on Wednesday: Mental Health Awareness Week

Kindness matters

This is the theme of this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week.
https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week/kindness-research
The research briefing is well worth reading and most of the articles that are cited are available electronically via the Library, just copy the title of the article and paste into Discovery.  

The evidence from the research is that kindness has a very positive impact on mental health. Be kind to others and to yourself!

Tuesday Top Tips: Being concise

Writing concisely is a skill that takes some time to fine tune but the results are definitely worth it!
Some things to avoid in your writing:
1. Repetition: Remove repeated information or words which are only slightly different.
2. Description: You should make sure that you only include key information rather than unnecessary details.
3. Definitions: You may be asked to define topics in your early assignments, but as you progress through your course, you will increasingly be writing as an expert. You don’t need to give definitions of commonly used technical terms.
4. Detail in introducing references: Your reference list includes all the bibliographical information about your sources. You shouldn’t give titles or other details in your assignments.
5. Redundant terms: Some words or phrases don’t add anything to your argument, so can easily be removed.
6. Excessive signposting: It’s easy to overdo your signposts, which can then irritate your reader by slowing them down. If you feel that you need to include lots of signposting, it might indicate that your structure should be revised.

Tuesday Top Tips: Masterclass

The next Succeed@Tees session to run via BlackBoard Collaborate will be ‘Dissertation Support – how Student and Library Services can support you from planning to completion of your dissertation ‘
Are you part way through or just about to undertake your dissertation or major project? If so, this webinar will take you through some of the support that is still available to you through Student and Library Services. The session is generic so does not cover any content that relates to specific subject areas. Content will include:
• UnderstandIng the key aspects of preparing for a dissertation or project
• IdentifyIng issues to consider in your planning, organisation of work and time management.
• Sources of support for your literature review, referencing and academic writing
The session will run on Tuesday 12th May, 14:00-15:00
To participate go to
https://eu.bbcollab.com/guest/b9100d2cacce49c0b629522bb9f9daaa
The session will be recorded and made available afterwards.

Fun Friday Finish: Quiz answers

1. Who said: “When you are growing up there are two institutional places that affect you most powerfully: the church, which belongs to God, and the public library, which belongs to you. The public library is a great equalizer”?
Answer: Keith Richards

2. Which book by Audrey Niffenegger features a librarian as the main character?
Answer: The Time Traveler’s Wife

3. Which singer, born in 1959, has a mother who was a librarian?
Answer: Morrissey

4. Which Library is considered to be the oldest in the world?
Answer: al-Qarawiyyin Library in Fez (859) is one answer-it is contestable, with others claiming the honour.

5. Which 1961 film, starring Audrey Hepburn has a scene in the New York Public Library?
Answer: Breakfast at Tiffany’s

6. Who was the most borrowed author from public libraries in the UK in 2017-18? (NB: latest figures available)
Answer: James Patterson

7. What was the best-selling book in the UK, week ending 17th April 2020?
Answer: Mrs Hinch: Little book of lists

8. Which song by INXS features a library?
Answer: Heaven Sent (1992)
Tuesday she works
In the library uptown
Some useful knowledge
Can always be found
Don’t burn the library
Till you’ve read all the books
Sometimes in life
You get a second look

9. Who opened Teesside University Library (then LRC) in 1997?
Answer: Mo Mowlam

10. Who is the Chief Librarian of the British Library?
Answer: Liz Jolly (former Director of SLS)

And the winner is…..Me! I get to keep the enormous bar of chocolate (the prize)

Working from home with (a) child(ren)

Working or studying from home, whilst also trying to care for a child and provide them with stimulus and school work can be a challenge.
These are our top tips from 6 weeks experience:
Wellbeing Child wellbeing
Children, (especially toddlers) demand a lot of attention and cannot be left to occupy themselves for long periods of time. 
  • Break off work to attend to your child’s needs (be that playing with toys/games; reading stories; providing food; giving cuddles; changing nappies etc.). 
  • This may require more flexibility (e.g.  work around your usual core hours of the day)
  • Get out of the house as a family and take in fresh air/nature on a daily basis so you do not feel as cooped up in lockdown (either by going out for a walk or spending time in the garden)
  • The BBC Bitesize toolkit has some useful resources: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/znsmxyc
  • The government also have useful resources: https://bit.ly/3fk9emr
Schooling Home schooling
  • If there is more than one adult in the house, divide up responsibilities so that you each get a break – e.g. one of you could be responsible for maths and another for literacy
  • Adapt activities so that they fit in with your child’s interests e.g. football for PE, writing stories about football for literacy, creating football top trumps for art …
  • Try BBC Bitesize programmes and the website (https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/dailylessons) – it is full of educational programmes and information, divided up by age groups (and makes you feel you are providing some sort of educational input!)
  • Think about demands on your wifi so that your child’s PS4 or XBox time isn’t when you’re trying to attend a key online class.
Getting work done Home working
  • Try getting up earlier (e.g. 6am), before your child is awake to get the key thinking work done
  • Do easy work at the time when you also have to help your child e.g. write the easier part of an assignment or read a chapter of a book
  • If you are on your own with your child, try not to schedule meetings or tutorials at these times, as it is difficult to give them full attention
  • If your child is still young, try to schedule meetings/tutorials during nap time.
  • If you need to have a Teams catch up/tutorial when looking after your child, try to have it without any audio/visual on so it is purely chat based.
  • Explain this to people and check this is ok with them.
Keeping your children busy Busy child
  • Schedule sessions on social networking apps so your child can “meet” their friends (though be careful of privacy features  and internet safety etc). 
  • If your child is “meeting” their friends, provide trivia games, quiz questions or ideas of things they can talk about in advance
  • If you have a garden and it is sunny, try sending your children out there to find a particular bug or creature
General advice
  • Routine, routine, routine – it helps keep you and your child on track and provides a structure to the day
  • Plan out all the meals for the week so you don’t have to try and think of something to have for lunch or tea on the spot. Speed is vital when a tiny person suddenly decides they are starving and need feeding fast!

Top Tips for Tuesday: Coping with Presentation Nerves

Improvisation techniques can be used as a way of helping with presentation nerves. A fun warm up exercise to try:

  • Make a lemon face – screw up your face really small as though you’ve just eaten a lemon
  • Make a pumpkin face – make your face as wide as you can – open your mouth wide (these two are to relax your face and remove tension)
  • Breathing exercise – in for a count of 4, hold for 4, out for 4
    Yawn really loudly (to open up your throat)
  • Brain exercises – say the days of the week to yourself quickly, then backwards, or try the same with the months of the year or try to give a name to each letter of the alphabet (this is to keep you in the moment and to stop your mind racing).

Monday Masterclass

Today’s Masterclass is at 12 noon: Group Work at a Distance
https://tees.libcal.com/event/3454450?hs=a

Have you been asked to carry out an assignment as a group? Group work at a distance brings extra challenges. This online session via BlackBoard Collaborate will give you hints and tips on how to enable your group to run smoothly including:
· managing group dynamics
· avoiding conflict
· group presentations

Fun Friday Finish: Library Quiz

1. Who said: “When you are growing up there are two institutional places that affect you most powerfully: the church, which belongs to God, and the public library, which belongs to you. The public library is a great equalizer”?

2. Which book by Audrey Niffenegger features a librarian as the main character?

3. Which singer, born in 1959, has a mother who was a librarian?

4. Which library is considered to be the oldest in the world?

5. Which 1961 film, starring Audrey Hepburn has a scene in the New York Public Library?

6. Who was the most borrowed author from public libraries in the UK in 2017-18? (NB: latest figures available)

7. What was the best-selling book in the UK, week ending 17th April 2020?

8. Which song by INXS features a library?

9. Who opened Teesside University Library (then LRC) in 1997?

10. Who is the Chief Librarian of the British Library?

Send your answers to f.porritt@tees.ac.uk. A small prize for the winner, announced next week. Answers will be on this page next Friday, 8th May.

Wednesday Wellbeing

 

Eating well is even more important in these difficult times.
Join us each Friday from 11am-12pm on Microsoft Teams to discuss everything food and nutrition. Do you need some tips to cook with limited supplies or some nutritional advice to help boost immunity and mood? We are extremely lucky to have qualified nutritionist, Kelly Rose, online each week to answer your questions. We’d also love to hear about what you’ve been cooking and baking.
https://libguides.tees.ac.uk/coronaviruslibraryupdate/studentsupport

Alternatively you can request to join the team by emailing Hazel Wright on h.wright@tees.ac.uk

Here are some e-books and journal articles on nutrition and immunity

Fuller & Roy (2003) Gut Flora, Nutrition, Immunity and Health. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Link
Kau, A.L., Ahern, P.P., Griffin, N.W., Goodman, A.L. & Gordon, J.I. (2011)’Human nutrition, the gut microbiome and the immune system’, Nature, 474 (7351), pp. 327-336. Link
Hall, G.H., Jean L. Wiecha Wiecha, L, J. & Georgia (2014) Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Out-of-School Time Settings. Jossey-Bass.
Link

Here is my fruit rainbow