2nd year student Beth Brownless fulfils her passion for film

Bethany Brownless, a 3rd year student on the BA honours Dance degree at Teesside University got the chance to put the skills she learnt in second year module Dance For Camera to the test this year working on several exciting professional projects. Beth has an interest in becoming a Videographer, creating screendances, and documenting different projects through film.

Over the summer period she completed a professional work placement as a videographer with Jennifer Essex, a senior lecturer at Teesside University. Beth documented Jennifer’s project Replicas, an interactive dance performance influenced by the evolution of communication and intimacy in relationships. Beth’s role as videographer involved creating a series of short films, documenting the rehearsal process, and performances at Stockton International Riverside Festival.

In October, Beth worked as a videographer for Lorraine Smith, a senior lecturer at Teesside University, Annie O’Donnell, an independent artist and Peter Heselton, a music producer documenting their performance of Elizabeth and the Three Sisters which was performed as part of Nightfall 2016.

Beth says:

“These experiences really challenged my skills as a videographer. I had to use my own initiative, allowing myself to experiment with camera angles, positioning, storylines, music choices and, editing abilities. I have had the opportunity to expand my knowledge as a videographer and this has enlightened my passion to take this further, gaining a future career from this. “

Watch one of Beth’s films:

Fertile Ground Dance Company workshop

Fertile Ground Dance Company visited the dance students this week to give an inspiring repertoire workshop based on the companie’s current pieces. Great to see our very own Bethany Robinson as part of the company this year! We are looking forward to welcome the company back for the audition in April!

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Subtle Kraft Dance Company

Subtle Kraft visited the University for a practical workshop with students on the BA (Hons) Dance course.

They returned the following day to stage a unique performance and question and answer session.

Subtle Kraft is an inclusive contemporary dance company who use movement as an expression of enjoyment, communication and humanity. The visit to Teesside was part of its ‘Moments Revisited’ tour which is also calling at London and Edinburgh.

Around 25 students took part in the workshop and benefited from learning new techniques and perspectives of dance teaching and choreography.

Lorraine Smith, Senior Lecturer in Dance, said: ‘Both myself and the students were inspired by Subtle Kraft’s work. The company engaged the students in new innovative methods of translating movement to a wide range of people. They create and present their work in a very interesting way and it provided the students with an inspiring approach to choreography and performance.’

Third year’s dance company Diverse@tees at Moving Frontiers

The third year’s dance company Diverse@tees has performed their piece ‘Lost Letters’ at Moving Frontiers hosted by FRESH, at the House of BlahBlah on Thursday 29th October. They are now happy to announce that they will be delivering workshops in secondary schools in the Teesside area, working closely with dance and props, comedy pieces and different dynamics.

If you are interested in booking a FREE Divers@Tees performance and/or workshop for your school, community group or event please contact them via their Facebook page.

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Teesside Lecturer takes on Huddersfield Costume Show

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This Summer Senior Dance Lecturer Lorraine Smith travelled down to Huddersfield University with Louise Logan (Teesside Student Researcher), Sadie Brooks and Emma Bryan (2nd year Teesside dance students on work placement) to choreograph the Costume with Textiles Degree Show 2015. The show consisted of 26 pieces, around 65 performers (in full costume) and only 10 days to do it in! Thankfully Costume lecturer Nadia Malik and her team were super organised and ready with tea on tap.

The costumes were fantastic and the performers (some of whom had never performed before) did a great job of bringing the characters to life. Lorraine also had the opportunity, with the help of Louise, to collect some interesting performer interviews, which will inform her future research into the impact of costume on the performer.

Lorraine hopes to take future dance students along as assistant choreographers next year.

Netotiloz, dance video with BA Dance students at international Festival

A dance video by international videographer and part-time lecturer Jessica Smith who directed BA Dance students in a video inspired by Mexican artist Carmen Avalos is being screened at Billingham International Folklore Festival of World Dance this week! Don’t miss to see the exciting events at this festival!

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Emotional Geography Conference, Edinburgh

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PDance lecturers Heike Salzer (Dance), alongside BA Dance Graduate Jessica Smith, international partner Ana Baer (Texas State University) (featured on picture ) and BSc Music Technology Lecturer Jack Laidlaw are presenting a panel session with the title ‘Motion and emotions through heterogeneous geographies’  at the 5th International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Emotional Geographies. at Edinburgh University.

A second panel will be delivered by School of Arts and Media lecturers, Dr Sarah O’Brien (Performance), Dr Chris Thurgar-Dawson (Creative Writing), Robert Burton (Design) and Gemma Draper, (Jewellery-Resident Artist at Mima)

This conference brings together scholars from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds, third sector partners and creative practitioners to explore and discuss the role of emotion in shaping and in experiencing space and society.

The need to pay attention to the role of emotions in personal, professional and societal life has been gaining acceptance in academic and public spheres since the time when these conferences were inaugurated. With greater attention has come a greater diversity of ways of researching and conceptualising emotions, affect and their kin, and a wider range of fields in which they are being studied. New technologies give individuals greater emotional reach than ever before. Meanwhile, industries structured around the manipulation of emotion have grown savvier than ever.