‘Being a Video-Choreographer’- article published in International Screendance Journal

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An article by Heike Salzer (Artistic Co-Director Tees Dance Film Fest) and Ana Baer (of Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema), has been published in the current issue of The International Journal of Screendance.
In the article, entitled ‘Being a Video-Choreographer: Describing the Multifaceted Role of a Choreographer Creating Screendance’, Heike interviews Ana about making and curating dance videos. The article is published in tandem with the Tees Dance Film Fest where many of the films cited in the article will be screened.
http://screendancejournal.org/index#.VVO3eFyvFiF

 

Teaching brings dance artist from Texas to Teesside

Teaching brings dance artist from Texas to Teesside

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International choreographer Professor Ana Baer has been working with students at Teesside University.

Professor Baer has been teaching dance for over 25 years in her native Mexico, Spain and America – for the past seven years as Associate Professor at Texas State University.

During her time at Teesside as a visiting academic, she led choreography masterclasses and worked with BA (Hons) Dance students to prepare for the University’s Creative Teesside, an annual celebration of work by students from across the wide range of creative subject areas within the School of Arts & Media.

She was also involved in the TDFF (Tees Dance Film Festival) where she gave a presentation on the prestigious international Sans Souci festival held in Colorada, which she co-directs.

Professor Baer, who has been involved in collaborative projects with Teesside University’s Dance Programme Leader Heike Salzer, said: ‘I knew nothing about the Northern part of England until I was introduced to it by Heike. Spending time here has been a wonderful experience.

‘I really enjoy working with students from various cultures as people move so distinctively in different locations. It is almost idiosyncratic to each place.

‘It is a challenge to develop and work on a piece of dance with students I have never met before, but I also enjoy the creative process and the students at Teesside have been wonderful. The culture of Teesside is very welcoming.’

Heike said: ‘It is extremely beneficial for our students to experience working with choreographers and international artists from varied cultural backgrounds as it helps to broaden their experience and it also helps us as teachers to share best practice.

‘Our international visiting academics scheme continues to produce fruitful collaborations and we’re hoping to develop our collaborative work further and looking at ways in which we can connect our students in Teesside with Ana’s students in Texas.’

 

Emotional Geography Conference, Edinburgh

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PDance lecturers Heike Salzer (Dance), alongside BA Dance Graduate Jessica Smith, international partner Ana Baer (Texas State University) (featured on picture ) and BSc Music Technology Lecturer Jack Laidlaw are presenting a panel session with the title ‘Motion and emotions through heterogeneous geographies’  at the 5th International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Emotional Geographies. at Edinburgh University.

A second panel will be delivered by School of Arts and Media lecturers, Dr Sarah O’Brien (Performance), Dr Chris Thurgar-Dawson (Creative Writing), Robert Burton (Design) and Gemma Draper, (Jewellery-Resident Artist at Mima)

This conference brings together scholars from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds, third sector partners and creative practitioners to explore and discuss the role of emotion in shaping and in experiencing space and society.

The need to pay attention to the role of emotions in personal, professional and societal life has been gaining acceptance in academic and public spheres since the time when these conferences were inaugurated. With greater attention has come a greater diversity of ways of researching and conceptualising emotions, affect and their kin, and a wider range of fields in which they are being studied. New technologies give individuals greater emotional reach than ever before. Meanwhile, industries structured around the manipulation of emotion have grown savvier than ever.