I am NOT a failure

Words on clearing and a secret revealed by Angela Lawrence, our Associate Dean for Marketing and Recruitment


One of the first WhatsApp messages I received on A Level results day this year was from a friend to tell me that her colleague’s son had not met his grades and he was devastated. It’s so hard to hear these words – devastated, destroyed, heartbroken.  My “go-to” response is to quote from Winston Churchill, who said

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts”

Whichever way you look at it, this years university applicants have had a rough ride. They never experienced GCSE exams, but then had to take A Level examinations.  They without doubt had a less than perfect learning experience during lockdown despite all the very best efforts of their teachers – it was just not the same as sitting in a classroom alongside friends each day. So to not get the results they hoped for probably feels like yet one more kick in the teeth following a uniquely unorthodox two or three years of study.

I’ll let you into a secret. I went through clearing, way back in the 80’s. It was actually my own fault – I didn’t work as hard as I should have done for my 4 A’ Levels and if I’m honest, I wasn’t completely surprised to find out that I hadn’t got the grades I needed to get in to my chosen uni. Nonetheless I felt that fear and devastation that so many applicants tell us they feel. Fortunately, my parents hit the clearing lines and it wasn’t too long before I had a couple of offers to choose from…roll forward several decades and I’m now close to completing a Doctorate. I am NOT a failure

Things have changed so much since then. Clearing is so much more accessible and such an easy process. Clearing is not seen as failure, but as opportunity. We’re told that there are far more applicants in clearing this year and I can speak from experience and say that our lines  were incredibly busy on A Level results day. We’re also speaking to lots of mature students, many of whom are realising that their dreams too can be fulfilled.

It’s hugely satisfying to know that we are turning devastation into delight and heartbreak to happiness through clearing.  So if you didn’t get the results that you hoped for, pick yourself up, dust yourself off, don’t see this as failure but as a new opportunity, and in Churchill’s words, have the courage to continue!


Teesside University’s clearing hotline

01642 738400

Art & Design Courses

Media & Journalism Courses

Music Technology Courses

Performing Arts Courses

Discover YOUR opportunity in clearing 

 

Student Installations at the Rye Reflections Art Trail

Students from the School of Arts & Creative Industries at Teesside University have teamed up with the Ryevitalise Landscape Partnership Project to create a series of installations for The Rye Reflections Art Trail, which can be visited throughout the Summer at Sutton Bank  

Price of Progress by Natasha Holmes

The Rye Reflections Art Trail is a joint project brought together by the Ryevitalise Landscape Partnership Project in the North York Moors National Park and students from the BA (Hons) Graphic Design and Illustration course at Teesside University, supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the UK’s largest funder of heritage. 

Graphic Design students created 5 installations which can be seen along the Art Trail – visitors are able to collect a map from Sutton Bank Visitor Centre which shows exactly where each installation is sited. The pieces have been inspired by memory landscape and changing human relationships to nature, agriculture, and technology. 

The Great Outdoors by Hazel Tilley

Central to the development of ideas have been oral histories collected as part of the Rye Reflections project. Details of each installation and the accompanying oral history extract can be seen on the Teesside University web page  

Students were supported by Senior Lecturer in Graphic Design, Charlie Tait, an inter-disciplinary designer who often works with cultural and heritage based subject matter. Charlie said: 

This project has required a deep engagement to develop creative responses that function in this specific environment. I think the students would agree the project has taken them into new areas of practice and given valuable insight into the practical constraints of realising their work.

We have worked together to analyse research, question concepts and test materials – it has been magical to see this work installed and reflect on the journey each student has been on as they respond to feedback to take their ideas forward.

The project has included an initial field trip with artist, Paula Hickey, and photographer, John Arnison, as well as presentations to project officers, Amy Carrick and Francesca Pert. These experiences have helped students gain insight into the collaborative nature of creative work. I would like to specifically thank our expert workshop technicians; their positivity and knowledge of materials has been invaluable.

‘R’ by Zhipeng Qiu

The installations will remain on the Rye Reflections Art Trail until October 2022 and represent a unique opportunity to see how students in the School of Art & Creative Industries work on live project briefs as part of their degree course. For further information about courses in Art and Design please visit the following pages  

Undergraduate courses in Art and Design 

Postgraduate courses in Art and Design 

What Cost Brand Loyalty?

It’s hard not to hear about the cost of living crisis, with food, petrol and utilities prices soaring daily – UK gas prices have now hit a three month high. With the government urging businesses to slash prices, how will this affect brand pricing and brand loyalty as we tighten our belts to make purchase decisions? Associate Dean, Angela Lawrence talks of her own brand loyalty challenges.


I love a tin of Heinz tomato soup, the flavour reminds me of my youth – Dad opening a family-sized tin of soup, warming it on the stove and dishing it out to our eagerly awaiting hands, scooping bowls like real life Oliver Twists. I’ve tried various supermarket brands, cheaper versions of tomato soup, but quite honestly nothing tastes quite like Heinz (with a dash of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce!).

 

We’re told that Britons are paying almost £3 more for an average 20-item shopping basket than 12 months ago and as my weekly basket cost increases, I noticed whilst browsing the supermarket shelves of late that my beloved tin of soup has now increased in price to well over £1. As I write, it is on offer at £1.10 in Sainsburys compared to 59p for their own brand version. A search online shows that I’m not alone in loving that Heinz taste and that the Asda version at 50p is as good as it gets. So, naturally I’m going to give it a try – if it hits the mark then Asda could become my new best friend. 

So, I am prepared to sacrifice my loyalty to the Heinz brand and The Grocer magazine reports that up and down the country frugal shoppers are making similar decisions – 34% of us are switching branded products for cheaper alternatives. Yet as a marketer, I am passionate about branding, I teach students about branding and I recognise the importance of branding for business success.  Branding enables businesses to grow loyalty, to command higher prices and to stand out and be recognised amongst competitors.

However, it’s not all about selling at a higher price – businesses invest heavily in branding campaigns and seek to connect with their target audience with strong branding. If we want our country to crawl out of the threatened recession then we surely want businesses to be successful – it’s not just the powerhouses such as Heinz, but the SMEs up and down the country who all invest in, and rely on branding for business success.

The struggle is real and the branding dilemma seems to be affecting stocks of branded products already, my favourite soup included. I wonder whether this is the end for branding – will newly formed shopping habits remain once this cost of living crisis is over, or will we simply revert to making purchase decisions based on brand loyalty? Will belief in the power of branding be damaged and will brands ultimately have less power? Perhaps brand owners will have to consider new tactics to appeal and maybe trimming a penny or two here and there will make the difference.

Lots to ponder over and I’m not sure that I have the answer, but I’m looking forward to healthy discussions about branding when students return to Teesside University in September. Meanwhile, I might just nip to Asda now, to purchase that tin of soup… which may help me to make up my mind!


The School of Arts & Creative Industries offers a wide range of courses that include modules on branding – here is a selection to browse through:

BA (Hons) Media and Communications

BA (Hons) Media Production

BA (Hons) Film and TV Production

BA (Hons) Journalism

MA Multimedia Public Relations

 

 

 

Three Good Reasons to Study for a Masters Degree

Studying for a masters degree is usually an option for anyone who has achieved a 2:2 or above in an undergraduate degree, although relevant professional experience is also considered. There are many reasons why people choose to study at postgraduate level, here are just 3 that prompted students to join the School of Arts and Creative Industries for their Masters degree study


Passion for a subject – many students just want to immerse themselves even further in the subject that they love. In the creative industries, often postgraduate students already run small businesses or sell their creations, so love to immerse themselves and learn even more about the subject that they love. Here’s what mature student Suzie Devay had to say

Employability – having that higher level qualification can make graduates more attractive to employers, so students often decide to further their studies to open more doors to their future career. Postgraduate study opened the doors to Neil Fatkin’s career in Journalism

Earning potential – evidence suggests that graduates with a postgraduate qualification have an increased lifetime earning potential. Hannah Cheetham decided to stay on to study at postgraduate level and aspires to progress to director level within a communications agency.

Emma graduated with an MSc Advanced Home Futures

With postgraduate loans of up to £11,836 and help available to find out what you may be entitled to, study at the School of Arts and Creative Industries may be more accessible than you think.

Hannah graduated with an MA Multimedia Public Relations

Whatever your reason, we’ve got a wide range of creative postgraduate courses available, many of which can also be studied with Advanced Practice, enabling you to enhance your qualification by adding a second year of vocational or research based internship to the one-year master’s programme – take a look at what you could study (in alphabetical order of subject):

MSc Advanced Home Futures

MA Comics and Graphic Novels

MA Curating

MA Digital Media and Communications

MA Design

MA Fine Art

MA Illustration

MA Interior Design

MA Multimedia Public Relations

MA Producing for Film and Television

MA Visual Communication

Join us at our Open Day on 25th June if you would like to chat to an academic about postgraduate study

 

Visitors at a Postgraduate Open Day

Winner of the inaugural MIMA Great Create competition

In January we launched our first MIMA Great Create competition, open to anyone over the age of 16 in the North East. With a regional theme, we invited entrants to tell us about their love of the North East in a creative way and a wide range of drawings, paintings, illustrations, comic strips, graphic designs, fashion designs, videos, photographs and musical pieces were sent in.

Five of our finalists (left to right) Airen Sopany, Jake Beddow, Jonathan Raiseborough, Ella Miller and Grace Coverdale

Picking a winner was a daunting task for our illustrious panel of creative industry judges, from Film Producers to Cartoonists and Heads of Brand, who anonymously marked each entry against its fit to the brief, creativity, originality and ability to convey a lived experience of the area, amongst other things.

Finalist’s entries on display in the MIMA foyer

Six finalists were selected and they brought family and friends to join staff from the School of Arts and Creative Industries for an informal finalists celebration lunch on 28th May at the MIMA Gallery, where a pop-up exhibition of their entries was displayed.

MIMA Gallery Artisitic Director, Elinor Morgan announcing the winner

Elinor Morgan, Artisic Director for MIMA Gallery announced the winner of the Apple MacBook Pro – Jonathan Raiseborough for his illustration “Boro Skyline”.

Winner Jonathan Raiseborough

Second place went to Ella Miller for her risograph print

Second place winner, Ella Miller

and third place went to Airen Sopany for her fabric and fashion design.

3rd place winner Airen Sopany

Comments on the winning entry from our industry judges included:

The line work and composition in this image is just extraordinary. I love the limited choice of colours. The sense of space is really interesting as well taking it from the natural to the urban in one image but presenting it as a ying and yang rather than as contrasting forces.

Beautifully detailed, from top to bottom. It really makes the viewer feel as though they know the area. Really nice use of colours, shading (especially on the water) and composition to draw the viewer in.

A lovingly executed work. So much to see, all beautifully tied together and well organised. Not a bit of wasted space. An excellent evocation of the wild, unseen side of Teesside, much appreciated by those who know about it. Thoughtful and well done.

The success of the inaugural MIMA Great Create competition has motivated us to continue with a new competition to be launched in September. The new theme will be revealed on our competition web page and lecturers will be visiting schools and colleges in the region to tell students how they can enter, so keep your eye on this page for news coming soon!

Finalist Grace Coverdale with her acrylic painting on canvas ‘The decline of the Teesside steelworks industry’
Finalist Jake Beddow with his musical composition representing the history and current story of the Teesside region.

Read All About It!

TALENTED  media students have received prizes at Teesside University’s  annual Journalism Awards.


The annual Journalist Awards event, which was hosted by Helen Dalby, Audience & Content Director, Reach North East & Yorkshire, took place at the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (MIMA) as part of Teesside University’s Graduate Showcase.

Journalism students received awards based on exceptional work produced during the past academic year, with winners receiving a week’s work experience at the company which sponsors the individual award.

Winners were commended for the skills learnt on the BA (Hons) Journalism; BA(Hons) Sport Journalism and BA (Hons) Public Relations and Digital Communications degrees

 

Among the awards were Broadcast Journalist of the Year, Best Sport Feature Writer and Blogger of the Year.

Prizes included a number of work placements with Teesside Live, The Hartlepool Mail along with work experience at BBC Tees; Bauer Media and ITV News.

A number of special academic awards were also given out, including the award for the best degree Final Projects.

Award’s host Helen was promoted to digital editor in 2012 and was closely involved in the award-winning digital newsroom transformation which was piloted in Newcastle and Teesside in 2014 before being rolled out nationally.

Helen was made editor of ChronicleLive in 2016, and in 2019 became Editor-in-chief for the region, overseeing the newsrooms in Newcastle and Middlesbrough. She’s currently Audience and Content Director for Reach in the North East, Yorkshire and Humber, as well as leading Reach’s partnerships with the BBC Local Democracy Reporting Scheme and with Meta and the NCTJ for our community reporters. 

Paul Bailey, Course Leader for Journalism in the School of Arts and Creative Industries, said: “These awards recognise the hard work and excellent calibre of our current journalism students and the students were thrilled to be awarded their prizes by Helen.”

“I would like to thank all of the media organisations who generously contributed prizes to this celebration of our students’ achievements.”

Below is a list of the winners

Winner of Vlogger of the Year – sponsored by Teesside University Communications and Development

Holly Havelock

Winner of Content Producer of the Year  – Sponsored by Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (MIMA)

Tyler Atkinson  

Winner of Feature Writer of the Year –  sponsored by The Northern Echo newspaper

Scott McDonald 

Winner of Multimedia Journalist of the Year – sponsored by Teesside Live

Martyna Dydyk 

Winner of Community Reporter of the Year, sponsored by The Hartlepool Mail newspaper

Alicia Cuthbertson

Winner of Audio Journalist of the Year, sponsored by Bauer Media

Chris Cassidy 

Winners of Video Journalist of the Year, sponsored by UK Local TV

Alfie Lambert and Holly Havelock

Winner of Digital Communications Student of Year, sponsored by Harvey and Hugo PR Agency

Carina Gama

Winner of the Ali Brownlee Sports Coverage Award, sponsored by BBC Tees

Chris Cassidy

Winner of Creative Communications Campaign, sponsored by Durham County Cricket Club

Jamie Smith

Winner of Public Relations Student of the Year, sponsored by DTW PR Agency

Sarah Peacock

Winner of Broadcast Journalist of the Year, sponsored by ITV News

Charlotte Simpkin

Winner of Portfolio of the Year, sponsored by Great North Air Ambulance Service

Sarah Peacock

Winner of Sports Feature of the Year, sponsored by MFC Foundation

Tyler Atkinson.

Winner of Best Newcomer, sponsored by Teesside University

Gemma Woolston

Winners of Best Final Project, sponsored by Teesside University

Sarah Peacock and Martyna Dydyk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curating – what’s it all about?

Straight from latest issue of the  School of Arts & Creative Industries Magazine , we’re sharing extracts from an interview with MIMA’s exhibitions and collection curator, Helen Welford, who tells us a little bit about her job.


Helen studied BA (Hons) Fine Art in Manchester. Following graduation she moved back to the region and set up a studio. Keen to further her learning she undertook an MA Art Museum and Gallery Studies and began curating at Newcastle University, as well as getting involved with Saltburn Artists Projects. Helen’s role at MIMA has changed over the years. Beginning as a gallery assistant, she moved up through the ranks from assistant curator to exhibitions and collections curator

“My favourite thing about being a curator is working with artists to develop ideas for shows. I love working on commissions and helping artists develop new work. My job is incredibly varied and every day is different. From studio visits to planning an exhibition to designing the gallery’s look and feel, it can be very creative.”

The School of Arts & Creative Industries at Teesside University offers an MA Curating as well as a Degree Apprenticeship in Curating, which awards an MA Curating along with the apprenticeship qualification. The degree apprenticeship offers an excellent opportunity for individuals in a curating role to gain a masters level qualification in their specialism whilst discovering the benefits of networking with other like-minded curators, studying part-time in our international art gallery and museum MIMA (Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art), whilst still working and earning.

Helen’s advise for anyone considering a career in curating – “I recommend that you see as much art as possible. Read magazines and websites and soak it all up. Go to as much locally as you can but also try and go further afield. Art online has really advanced during the pandemic and it can be a great place to come across new artists. Go to openings and meet people. Ask for support and mentoring, people are happy to help. Middlesbrough is a great place to be in the art world and make things happen.”

Find out more about our Curating Degree Apprenticeship (MA)

 

 

Bamboozled

Fine Art students from the School of Arts & Creative Industries at Teesside University, recently curated their own exhibition with the support of Pineapple Black‘s contemporary arts space in Middlesbrough


The all-female student collective, in the second year of their Fine Art degree course, described their work as being based  upon responding and reacting to the works that they have discovered within their environment.

           

The exhibition process created an opportunity for the students to experiment with their craft and to find their preferred methods of work. It also allowed them to find faults in their work and correct future pieces – all vital learning for future events as they progress on to employment within the creative industries following graduation.

           

Identifying the challenges of curating an exhibition as a group was a new experience for the students, who come from a variety of art backgrounds – some studied art in college but for others this was a completely new direction.  Working out how their works were going to be installed, how to complement the space and each others work, and how to find appropriate entertainment to add that something extra to the event were all challenging considerations.

The students also recognised obstacles with their own work, with some pieces taking a lot of physical labour to complete and install, but these were overcome by working effectively as a team, resulting in an inspirational immersive arts experience, Bamboozled.

          

Lecturers from the School of Arts & Creative Industries supported the students, offering new perspectives to both making and displaying works and working closely with the them to ensure they were fully satisfied with the overall look and feel of their work and the exhibition as a whole.

The installation period was collectively our favourite part of the process

quotes student Leah Roberts,

seeing all of our hard work come together in a much larger space was really enjoyable.”

 

More of the students’ work can be seen on their Instagram accounts:

@lozbrick.art
@emily_unthank_art
@kats_artandstuff
@alibdl.work 
@art_leah_99
@mollymay_art_

The BA (Hons) Fine Art at Teesside University provides studio-based learning that allows students to specialise in painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography and/or new media. Students have open access to all media workshops to develop their personally defined project themes.

Teeside University’s has an Open Day on Saturday June 25th for anyone wishing to explore the facilities, tour the campus and chat with lecturers and students

Great Creations From Visiting Students

Students from Middlesbrough College and Stockton Riverside College spent the afternoon at Teesside University this week, participating in workshops delivered by the School of Arts & Creative Industries.

The workshops were part of the school’s MIMA Great Create activity days. A range of workshop activities were provided, from 3D modelling to drawing with nature and designing their own T-shirts.

One group of students made use of the university’s Adobe Create Campus status and were provided with guest logins, enabling them to use Adobe Spark. They were taught how they could source royalty-free images to create their own e-zine  

Teachers accompanying the students enjoyed the activities, feeding back to the academic team “great to meet you and love the work the students did”

The School of Arts & Creative Industries is holding one more MIMA Great Create Activity Day on Wednesday 13th April – anyone interested in coming along to experience the facilities on offer can register here

 

Find out more about our courses:

 

It’s Competition Time!

 

The School of Arts and Creative Industries at Teesside University opens its doors once again on 30th March, with workshops and activities to encourage creative thinking and possibly sow the seeds for some new entries to our MIMA Great Create competition. Register here if you want to come along and join us.

With 6 weeks to go until the deadline for entries Elinor Morgan, Artistic Director of MIMA (Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art) and judge for the competition, invites entrants to surprise her with their entries. Here’s what she has to say…

Elinor Morgan talks about the MIMA Great Create competition


Find out about our courses at the School of Arts & Creative Industries:

Art & Design

Media & Journalism

Music Technology

Performing Arts