Norfolk Pond Project

This post highlights another project Carl Sayer, Lake BESS’s principal investigator, is involved with: The Norfolk Pond Project. Ponds sustain a major share of freshwater diversity yet they have been subjected to near-systematic destruction, pollution or abandonment since WWII.

After years of neglect by conservation and research compared to other habitats, ponds are finally being incorporated into UK aquatic conservation approaches and the Norfolk Pond Project is an excellent example:

“Norfolk holds more ponds than any other English county with an estimated 23,000 ponds present. Most of these ponds are located in farmland, and have their origins as marl or clay pits and in some cases livestock-watering ponds dug in the 17th to 19th centuries. “

Sayers_Black_Pit1_June_2013“In addition the Brecks, west Norfolk and sites north of Norwich are home to some of the most amazingly diverse ancient ponds in the UK, pingos – ponds that occupy ice depressions formed during the last great ice age. A great place to see pingos is at Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s nature reserve, Thompson Common.”

“The Norfolk Ponds Project aims to reverse the decline of Norfolk’s ponds so that agricultural landscapes contain a mosaic of clean water ponds with fewer ponds overgrown by trees and bushes.” Read the leaflet for more information on this exciting new project!

Thanks to Carl for providing all the material for this post.

Ponds and aquatic plants near Catcliffe and Treeton, East of Sheffield, UK

Last August, I was fortunate to be shown several ponds near Catcliffe and Treeton, East of Sheffield, UK, by Bob Croxton, form Sorby Natural History Society. The area is full of history and is a fascinating example of nature recovering following industrialisation.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFor instance, one of the ponds visited was formed in a lost piece of land amongst spoil heaps and three railway line! At this site Persicaria maculata and Nymphoides peltata were in full bloom (see picture) and two Potamogeton species were observed, now confirmed as P. pectinatus and P. pusillus. However only one shore was prospected and other nice aquatic plants are likely to be present in the rest of the pond.

On the whole, too many of the water bodies in the area were absolutely dominated by Elodea nuttallii, an invasive species that colonised the UK from the 1970s. It’s phenomenal spread in Britain and Ireland is summarised in a paper by Simpson that can be read from the BSBI archives. It remains unclear whether this spread has caused arm to aquatic biodiversity or whether it was simply facilitated by degraded habitats.

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Persicaria amphibia (amphibious bistort) in full bloom! East Sheffield, UK

Pondweeds

Pondweeds

The islands of Britain and Ireland have over 40 species or hybrids of pondweeds (genus Potamogeton). This diversity in pondweed is one of the highest in Europe with most European species being represented. Unfortunately local diversity and abundance of pondweeds have declined over the 20th Century, as a result of habitat destruction and pollution. The Upper Lough Erne region and The Broads are two areas of importance for the conservation of pondweed – but “what can we learn from these strongholds?” and “what measure could enhance their recovery nationally?” are questions we are trying to address part of the Lake BESS project. (Photo by Ambroise Baker: P. polygonifolius in full bloom).