New Paper: Dung fungal spores for the study of past megaherbivores

Van Asperen, E.N., Perrotti, A., Baker, A. (2020) Coprophilous fungal spores: NPPs for the study of past megaherbivores.

Published online on Dec. 2020 /Jan. 2021

This publication, lead by my colleague Eline van Asperen, will be an invaluable resources to scholars researching past populations of megharbivores or other aspects of palaeoeology using non-pollen palynomorphs, whether be it for the MSc dissertation, PhD, postdoc or at any point of their career. It is supplemented by an open-access key to the identification of dung fungal spores, which supersedes that previously provided on this blog (but some may find useful to still have access to both!):

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.5240664

Abstract:

Spores from coprophilous fungi are some of the most widely used non-pollen palynomorphs. Over the last decades, these spores have become increasingly important as a proxy to study the Pleistocene and Holocene megafauna. Although the number of types used in palaeoecology is relatively small, there is a wide range of coprophilous fungal taxa whose utility in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction remains under-researched. However, environmental and taphonomic factors influencing preservation and recovery of these spores are still poorly understood. Furthermore, our understanding of whether and how spores are transported across the landscape is limited.

Dung fungal spore presence appears to correlate well with megaherbivore presence. However, depending on the site, some limitations can remain to quantitative reconstructions of megaherbivore abundance from dung fungal spore records. The presence of dung fungal spores is often more significant than their absence and variation in in abundance with time should be interpreted with caution. Correlation with other proxies may provide a promising way forward.

The majority of studies using dung fungal spores as an indicator for large herbivore abundance are of records of Late Pleistocene and Holocene age, with a focus on Late Quaternary megafaunal extinction. However, more research could potentially extend records further back in time.

PhD Opportunity: Tees estuary seals and ecological recovery

Dr Ambroise Baker and Dr Jamie Bojko, are offering a unique opportunity to undertake PhD studies researching the recolonization and resilience of seals (Phoca vitulina and Halichoerus grypus) in the Tees estuary, UK, following heavy industrialisation. This project connects with local partners, veterinarians and conservation groups, who provide long-standing data sets of seal population size, disease and behaviour. These data, complemented by data collected during the project, will be used to develop a model of ecosystem recovery and explore a positive narrative for conservation.

This exciting project focuses on how the population dynamic of a charismatic apex predator responds to pollution, disease, and connectivity across the North Sea. The student will have an opportunity to undertake multidisciplinary research, and develop a unique range of skills, from multivariate quantitative analysis, data collection in the field as well as molecular work in our state-of-the-art laboratories. This is a fantastic chance to work with a range of collaborators, providing additional insights into a professional career in ecology. We are looking for candidates with a strong interest in molecular ecology and environmental science, with a positive approach to develop conservation solutions within coupled human-nature systems.

Any question, email Ambroise and Jamie – a.baker@tees.ac.uk and j.bojko@tees.ac.uk

Link to FindaPhD advert

Apply to this competitive studentship: https://www.tees.ac.uk/sections/research/funding_details.cfm?fundingID=98