Lecturer in Biology, Teesside University, UK

From August 2018, I will be a Lecturer in Biology at Teesside University, School of Engineering, Science and Design, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire, UK. I will be contributing to Biological and Environmental Science teaching as well as developing research.

My teaching and research are focussed on understanding how biodiversity and ecosystems respond to environmental change. This understanding is critically important to developing evidence-based policies to conserve biodiversity, protect the environment and maintain ecosystem services in the current context of global change.

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Assistant Editor short-term contract at the Journal of Experimental Botany

In June and July 2018 I will be working as Assistant Editor for the Journal of Experimental Botany based at Lancaster University’s Environment Centre. The Journal of Experimental Botany is a top journal in plant science owned by the Society of Experimental Biology and published by Oxford University Press. I will be guiding newly submitted papers on their journey though the peer-review process.

 

Research linking rare aquatic plant distribution and palaeoecological data presented at IPA-IAL 2018 conference, Stockholm, Sweden.

Professor Helen Bennion presented some of our NERC Hydroscape research at the joint meeting of the International Paleolimnology Association and the International Association of Limnogeology, Stockholm, Sweden, June 18-21, 2018 (see site).

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Some of the research highlighted during this talk concerned the distribution of Elatine hydropiper (eight-stamen waterwort) in the Glasgow area. This aquatic plant is extremely inconspicuous and can grow at great depth underwater. Because of these characteristics it is believed to be very under-recorded by botanist and aquatic monitoring alike. It has also been hypothesised that it may be becoming more frequent, especially in Scotland. However our research demonstrates that in the Glasgow area, Elatine hydropiper was present in the 1850s at four lake sites out of eight investigated and became extirpated at two of these sites during the twentieth century. This shows that it was more widespread in the past and that more effort towards conserving suitable habitats for this aquatic plant should be undertaken.

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Underwater Elatine hydropiper lawn, with Elodea. This pictures shows how this rare aquatic plant thrives at the interface between water and soft sediments. Loch Bardowie, Glasgow, 2016.
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Elatine hydropiper on a clipboard. This pictures shows the green part of the plant to are located at the sediment surface and the green parts that grow buried in sediment.  Lochend Loch, Glasgow, 2017